Bitwise & Logical Operators

& Bitwise AND

The & operator compares two values with a bitwise AND function. You use the & operator with two operands, like this:

Evaluate a & b

Each of the operands a and b is converted to a binary number, and each of their bits is compared; that is, bit 1 of a is compared with bit 1 of b, and so on. When two corresponding bits are both 1, bitwise AND combines them to produce 1. When one or both of the corresponding bits are 0, bitwise AND combines them to produce 0.

For example, if you enter

Evaluate 25 & 77

25 and 77 are combined with a bitwise AND, and the result is 9.

~ Bitwise NOT

In a logical expression, the ~ operator computes the binary negative of a number. The binary negative is calculated by converting a character's 0 bits to 1 bits and its 1 bits to 0 bits.

For example, to find the binary negative of 5, you could enter

Evaluate ~5

The result of this command is -6.

| Bitwise OR

The | operator compares two values with a bitwise OR function. You use the | operator with two operands, like this:

Evaluate a | b

Each of the operands a and b is converted to a binary number, and each of their bits is compared; that is, bit 1 of a is compared with bit 1 of b, and so on. When two corresponding bits are both 0, bitwise OR combines them to produce 0. When either of the corresponding bits is 1, bitwise OR combines them to produce 1.

For example, if you enter

Evaluate 25 | 77

25 and 77 are combined with a bitwise OR, and the result is 93.

^ Bitwise XOR

The ^ operator compares two values with a bitwise XOR (that is, a bitwise exclusive OR) function. You use the ^ operator with two operands, like this:

Evaluate a ^ b

Each of the operands a and b is converted to a binary number, and each of their bits is compared; that is, bit 1 of a is compared with bit 1 of b, and so on. When one of the bits--but not both--is 1, bitwise XOR combines them to produce 1. When both bits are 0 or when both bits are 1, bitwise XOR combines them to produce 0.

For example, if you enter

Evaluate 25 ^ 77

25 and 77 are combined with a bitwise XOR, and the result is 84.

+= Increment a variable

The += character is used only with the Evaluate command and adds the value on the right side of the expression to the variable on the left side. For example, in the command

Evaluate myVar += 2

the value of {myVar} is increased by 2. In the Evaluate command, you do not need to place the variable name inside braces because the command does not extract the value of the variable.

-= Decrement a variable

The -= character is used only with the Evaluate command and subtracts the value on the right side of the expression from the variable on the left side. For example, the command

Evaluate myVar -= 2

decreases the value of {myVar} by 2. In the Evaluate command, you do not need to place the variable name inside braces because the command does not extract the value of the variable.

== Equal to (strings, numbers, and variables)

The character == means "equals" when it compares text strings, arithmetic values, or variables that contain text strings or arithmetic values. If the value of the expressions are equal, the command returns 1, meaning true; if the expressions are not equal, the command returns 0, meaning false.

The command

Evaluate (3 * 4 * 27) == (6 * 9 * 3 * 2)

computes the values of each side and returns the value 1, for true. Note that arithmetic expressions use integer arithmetic. For example, the expression 5 2 yields 2, not 2.5.

The command

Evaluate {a} == 0

checks whether the current value of the variable {a} is 0 and returns 1 or 0.

When used with a text string, the match is case sensitive; for example,

Evaluate "theWorld" == "theworld"

returns 0.

=~ Equivalent to (patterns)

The =~ operator is used with the Evaluate command to evaluate whether a text string, or a variable that contains a text string, matches a regular expression. You must place the left operand within double quotation marks and the right operand within forward slashes. For example, the following command evaluates the strings yes and no, finds that they are not the same, and displays a 0, meaning false:

Evaluate "yes" =~ /no/

You can also use the =~ character with variables, as in

Evaluate "{a}" =~ /{b}/

which compares the current values of the variables {a} and {b}. If {a} and {b} have the same value, Evaluate returns 1, meaning true. If {a} and {b} do not have the same value, Evaluate returns 0, meaning false. The command

Evaluate "{a}" =~ /$[0-9a-f]+/

checks whether the variable {a} contains a hexadecimal number. If {a} does, Evaluate returns 1. If {a} does not contain a hexadecimal number, Evaluate returns 0.

> Greater than

In arithmetic expressions, the > character means "greater than." You can use the > character to compare the values of numbers or variables. For example, the command

Evaluate 5 > 10

evaluates whether 5 is greater than 10 and then displays 0, meaning false, in the active window. Likewise, the command

Evaluate {a} > {b}

evaluates the current values of {a} and {b} and then displays 0 (false) or 1 (true) in the active window. If you enter the commands

Set a 4
Set b 3
Evaluate {a} > {b}

Evaluate displays 1 in the active window.

>= Greater than or equal to

The >= character means "greater than or equal to" and has the same meaning as the ≥ character.

≥ Greater than or equal to [Option-.]

The ≥ character means "greater than or equal to" and has the same meaning as the >= character.

You can use the ≥ character to compare the values of numbers or variables. For example, the command

Evaluate 15 ≥ 10

evaluates whether 15 is greater than or equal to 10 and then displays 1 (true) in the active window. Likewise, the command

Evaluate {a} ≥ {b}

compares the current values of the variables {a} and {b}, and displays either 0 (false) or 1 (true) in the active window. If you enter the commands

Set a 100
Set b 88
Evaluate {a} ≥ {b}

Evaluate displays 1 in the active window.

< Less than

In arithmetic expressions, the < character means "less than." You can use the < character to compare the values of numbers or variables. For example, the command

Evaluate 5 < 10

evaluates whether 5 is less than 10, and then displays 1, meaning true, in the active window. Likewise, the command

Evaluate {a} < {b}

evaluates the current values of the variables {a} and {b} and displays either 0 (false) or 1 (true) in the active window. If you enter the commands

Set a 7
Set b 77
Evaluate {a} < {b}

Evaluate displays 1 in the active window.

<= Less than or equal to

The <= character means "less than or equal to" and has the same meaning as the ≤ character.

≤ Less than or equal to [Option-,]

The ≤ character means "less than or equal to" and has the same meaning as the <= character.

You can use the ≤ character to compare the values of numbers or variables. For example, the command

Evaluate 15 ≤ 10

evaluates whether 15 is less than or equal to 10 and then displays 0, which means false, in the active window. Likewise, the command

Evaluate {a} ≤ {b}

compares the current values of the variables {a} and {b} and displays either 0 or 1 in the active window. If you enter the commands

Set a 88
Set b 100
Evaluate {a} ≤ {b}

Evaluate displays 1 in the active window.

&& Logical AND

The && operator means logical AND and has the same meaning as the AND operator.

AND Logical AND

The AND operator means logical AND and has the same meaning as the && operator.

Logical AND is based on the principle that if both sides of an expression are true (that is, not equal to 0), then the expression is true. If either side or both sides of the expression are false (that is, equal to 0), the expression is false.

For example, the command

Evaluate 2 AND 3

returns 1, or true. But the command

Evaluate 2 AND 0

returns 0. You can use the AND operator to check whether the value of a variable is 0. For example, if you enter

Evaluate {Status} AND {Value}

Evaluate returns 0 if either variable is currently set to 0.

! Logical NOT
In arithmetic expressions, the ! operator means logical NOT and has the same meaning as the ¬ operator and the NOT operator.
¬ Logical NOT [Option-L]

In arithmetic expressions, the ¬ operator means logical NOT and has the same meaning as the ! operator and the NOT operator.

The ¬ operator is also used in selection expressions

NOT Logical NOT

In arithmetic expressions, the NOT operator means logical NOT and has the same meaning as the ¬ and ! operators. Logical NOT evaluates whether a number or variable has a value of 0. If the character or variable has a value of 0, the result of the command is 1, which means true. If the character or variable has a value other than 0, the result of the command is 0, which means false.

For example, the command

Evaluate NOT 100

displays 0 in the active window. But the command

Evaluate NOT 0

displays 1.

|| Logical OR

The || operator means logical OR and has the same meaning as the OR operator.

OR Logical OR

The OR operator means logical OR and has the same meaning as the || operator.

Logical OR is based on the principle that if either side of a statement is true (that is, not equal to 0), the statement is true. If both sides of a statement are false (that is, equal to 0), then the statement is false.

For example, the command

Evaluate 2 OR 0

returns 1, or true. However, the command

Evaluate 0 OR 0

returns 0, or false. You can use the OR operator to check whether the value of a variable is 0. For example, if you enter

Evaluate {checking} OR {savings}

Evaluate returns 0 only if the current values of both {checking} and {savings} are 0. If either {checking} or {savings} has a positive or negative value, Evaluate returns 1.

!= Not equal to (strings, numbers, and variables)

The != operator means "not equal to" and is used between two numbers or variables in an expression. The != operator has the same meaning as the <> and ≠ operators.

<> Not equal to

The <> operator means "not equal to" and is used between two numbers or variables in an expression. The <> operator has the same meaning as the ≠ and the != operators.

Not equal to [Option-=]

The ≠ operator means "not equal to" and is used between two numbers or variables in an expression. The operator has the same meaning as the != and the <> operators.

If the two sides of the expression are not equal, the command returns 1, meaning true. If the two sides are equal, the command returns 0, meaning false.

For example, the command

Evaluate 2 ≠ 5

is 1, or true. If you enter a command like

Evaluate {a} ≠ {b}

the command checks the current values of the variables {a} and {b}, determines whether they are not equal, and returns 1 for true, or 0 for false.

!~ Not equivalent to (patterns)

The !~ character is used with the Evaluate command to evaluate whether a text string or a variable that contains a text string matches a regular expression. When you use the !~ character between two operands, you must place the left operand within double quotation marks and the right operand within forward slashes. For example, the following command evaluates the strings yes and no, finds that they are not the same, and displays a 1, meaning true:

Evaluate "yes" !~ /no/

You can also use the !~ character with variables, as in

Evaluate "{a}" !~ /{b}/

This example compares the current values of the variables {a} and {b}. If {a} and {b} have the same value, Evaluate returns 0, meaning false. If {a} and {b} do not have the same value, Evaluate returns 1, meaning true. The command

Evaluate "{a}" !~ /$[0-9a-f]+/

returns 1 (for true) if the variable {a} does not contain a hexadecimal number.

<< Shift left

The << operator performs a shift left function on a number. A shift left function shifts a value's bits n characters to the left. The bits that are shifted out through the high-order bit are lost. For example, if you enter

Evaluate 3 << 1

the bit pattern in the number 3 is shifted left by one place. In other words, the bit pattern

... 0000 0011 #the value 3

becomes

... 0000 0110 #the value 6

Shifting left one place actually has the effect of multiplying a value by 2.

>> Shift right

The >> operator performs a shift right function on a number. A shift right function shifts a value's bits n characters to the right. The bits moved out of the low-order bit are lost, and the bits shifted in to the high-order bits on the left have a value of 0. For example, if you enter

Evaluate 3 >> 1

the bit pattern

... 0000 0011

becomes

... 0000 0001

which has a value of 1. The right shift is a logical right shift, because bits with a value of 0 are moved into the high-order bits.